Why am I getting weird result using parseInt in node.js? (different result from chrome js console)

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differentresultconsoleusinggetting
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Why can the surface temperature of a star be calculated using the Stefan-Boltzmann Law ,Undefined behavior occurs when the string being passed to parseInt has a leading 0, and you leave off the radix parameter. ,Since both are based on V8, why same operation yielding different results???,ExpressionEngine® Answers

You'll want to use:

parseInt("03010123", 10);
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Javascript is weird. Don’t believe me? Try converting an array of strings into integers using map and parseInt. Fire up your console (F12 on Chrome), paste in the following, and press enter (or run the pen below).

Javascript is weird. Don’t believe me? Try converting an array of strings into integers using map and parseInt. Fire up your console (F12 on Chrome), paste in the following, and press enter (or run the pen below).

['1', '7', '11'].map(parseInt);
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It's continuation of story with previous bug in modern environment (tested with Chrome 71 and Node.js v11.8.0).,// > means the result of console.log or another output. For example:,The console refuses to run it at all!,What is the result of the expression below?

#[1.22 .0](v1 .21 .2...v1 .22 .0)(2021 - 06 - 07)

# # # Features

   *
   A setTimeout object([#210](# 210))([156 d265](156 d265))
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nodemon or supervisor for automatic restart,The source code for the example is the following:,In this article we will talk about the most common mistakes Node developers make and how to avoid them. You can find the source code for the examples on github.,1 Not using development tools 1.1 Automating restarts 1.2 Automatic browser refresh

What these modules do is to watch for file changes and restart the server for you. Let us take nodemon for example. First you install it globally:

  npm i nodemon - g
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Here we have a mantissa of 1 and the exponent of 0. Using this information you may assume that the number is represented in floating point like this:,IEEE754 floating point allocates bits to store a number sign, its mantissa (significant digits) and exponent. Here is the how it distributes those bits in the double-precision format (64 bit for each number) used by JavaScript’s Number type:,If we assemble the numbers back from their representation as floating point into scientific form, here is what we have:,Immer is a tiny library that uses structural sharing and proxy objects to guarantee the immutability pattern in the most efficient way. It's also very convenient when writing reducers to shorten code and ensure type safety.

This misunderstanding may cause a great deal of confusion. Let’s, for example, take this loop written in Java:

< > Copyfor(int i = 1; 1 / i > 0; i++) {
   System.out.println("Count is: " + i);
}
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var myInt = parseInt("10.256"); //10
var myFloat = parseFloat("10.256"); //10.256
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The toLocaleString() method returns a string with a language-sensitive representation of this number. ,A string with a language-sensitive representation of the given number., Prior to ES5.1, implementations were not required to throw a range error exception if toLocaleString is called with arguments. , The results provided by toLocaleString can be customized using the options argument:

toLocaleString()
toLocaleString(locales)
toLocaleString(locales, options)
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We will look at some code snippets with surprising results, and we will do an explanation of what is going on, so that we can better understand our beloved programming language. Though it’s a weirdo, we love it!,Today we are going to make a special post dedicated to those weird JavaScript moments, where things behave a little bit strange., Deep-dive into the world of JavaScript Promises, creating them, consuming them, async/await and more. ,Some things in JS are simply weird, it’s the way the language is design, and we accept it the way it is. Let’s see some weird array equalities:

['1', '7', '11'].map(parseInt);
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So then this is one of the little things about parseInt that a javaScript developer should be ware of when making use of it when working with numbers that will go off into notation., JavaScript While Plant Grid idle game prototype example , Canvas Module JavaScript example ,I assume that you have at least some background when it comes to the subject of getting started with javaScript. There are a number of ways to get started if you have not done so all ready and even if you have there are other ways to go about playing around with the basics other than the way that you might be familiar with thus far. When it comes to playing around with simple expressions often I can get away with just opening up the javaScript console in chrome as a way to do so for example.

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