Order by desc psql

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order
90%

DESC is optional, It sorts the result set in descending order by

Example_snippet/controller/utility/_order.js/ SELECT_id. . .
SELECT_id
Step 2 continued with FROM tabs. . .
FROM tabs
Step 3 continued with [WHERE conds]. . .
[WHERE conds]
Step 4 continued with ORDER BY expression_id [ASC | . . .
ORDER BY expression_id[ASC | DESC | USING operator][NULLS FIRST | NULLS LAST];
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88%

We have used the column name in the order by clause to sort data in our query’s specified order,,Using order by function in PostgreSQL, our data comes in the specified order

Example_snippet/controller/utility/_order.js/ SELECTcolumn-list (list of col. . .
SELECTcolumn - list(list of columns)
FROM table_name(name of table)[WHERE condition]
   [ORDER BY column1, column2, …, columnN(name of columns)][ASC | DESC];
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72%

When you execute a PostgreSQL query, being able to sort the returned records makes your results more readable and helps you gain better insights from your data, The ORDER BY keywords allow you to specify a column on which to sort your results; adding the DESC clause makes it easy to sort in descending order

Example_snippet/controller/utility/_order.js/ ORDER BY. . .
ORDER BY
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65%

When sorting your result set in descending order, you use the DESC attribute in your ORDER BY clause as follows:,When sorting your result set using the PostgreSQL ORDER BY clause, you can use the ASC and DESC attributes in a single SELECT statement,,This PostgreSQL ORDER BY example would return all records sorted by the last_name field in ascending order and would be equivalent to the following ORDER BY clause:,This PostgreSQL ORDER BY would return all records sorted by the last_name field in ascending order, with a secondary sort by first_name in descending order

Example_snippet/controller/utility/_order.js/ SELECT expressions FROM tables. . .
SELECT expressions
FROM tables
   [WHERE conditions]
ORDER BY expression[ASC | DESC | USING operator][NULLS FIRST | NULLS LAST];
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75%

Actually, PostgreSQL uses the default B-tree operator class for the column's data type to determine the sort ordering for ASC and DESC, Conventionally, data types will be set up so that the < and > operators correspond to this sort ordering, but a user-defined data type's designer could choose to do something different

Example_snippet/controller/utility/_model.js/ SELECT select_list FROM ta. . .
SELECT select_list
FROM table_expression
ORDER BY column1[ASC | DESC][, column2[ASC | DESC]...]
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