Loop 0xb7 assembles but won't link

Asked
Active3 hr before
Viewed126 times

3 Answers

90%

Connect and share knowledge within a single location that is structured and easy to search., What was the affiliation of the "Reverend Mother" who assisted with Jessica's spice agony? , Extra attack timing: can it be interrupted? , Jobs Programming & related technical career opportunities

GCC Issue... Command: gcc -m32 -o key shellcode.o Error:

/usr/bin / ld: shellcode.o: in function `_start':
shellcode.asm:(.text+0x0): multiple definition of `
_start '; /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/8/../../../../lib32/Scrt1.o:(.text+0x0): first defined here /
   usr / bin / ld: /usr/lib / gcc / x86_64 - linux - gnu / 8 / .. / .. / .. / .. / lib32 / Scrt1.o: in function `_start':
(.text+0x28): undefined reference to `
main ' /
   usr / bin / ld: shellcode.o: in function `_start':
shellcode.asm:(.text+0xbc): relocation truncated to fit: R_386_PC8 against ` * UND * '
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
load more v
88%

Both for loops in loop() produce incorrect output. But different.,I understand your theories, but it is tots odd that printing the array values (after each loop) does not trigger the issue but shows the array contents as correct.,alto777: I understand your theories, but it is tots odd that printing the array values (after each loop) does not trigger the issue but shows the array contents as correct.,Strange enough, I wasn't able to reproduce this issue on x86 or ARM (but I didn't try that hard).

my output:

hello reverse bits timing test world!

   0 0 0 0
1 1 0 80
2 2 2 40

0
80
40

0 0 0 0
1 1 0 80
2 2 B8 40

0
80
40
load more v
72%

To get a slowly decreasing PWM sequence like the one shown in the graph, you would need to write a loop that gradually decreases the motor speed over time.,Give your robot a memory: have its maximum speed increase after it has been on the line consistently for a few cycles.,1000–3000: the robot is approximately centered on the line. In this case, we set both motors to speed 100, to drive straight ahead.,Display sensor readings on the LCD. Since writing to the LCD takes a significant amount of time, you should do this at most few times per second.

A simple circuit for monitoring battery voltage is built in to the 3pi. Three resistors, shown in the circuit at right, comprise a voltage divider that outputs a voltage equal to two-thirds of the battery voltage, which will always be safely below the main microcontroller’s maximum analog input voltage of 5 V. For example, at a battery voltage of 4.8 V, the battery voltage monitor port ADC6 will be at a level of 3.2 V. Using 10-bit analog-to-digital conversion, where 5 V is read as a value of 1023, 3.2 V is read as a value of 655. To convert it back to the actual battery voltage, multiply this number by 5000 mV×3/2 and divide by 1023. This is handled conveniently by the read_battery_millivolts_3pi() function (provided in the Pololu AVR Library; see Section 6 for more information), which averages ten samples and returns the battery voltage in mV:

unsigned int read_battery_millivolts_3pi() {
   return readAverage(6, 10) * 5000 L * 3 / 2 / 1023;
}
load more v