Is Context compatible with “complex” objects?

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complexcontext
90%

Yes, you can have more than one context objects in the same service interface.,Assign the Context Object created in step 1 to corresponding Xpath of the Message Type or External Definition in Outbound Service Interface. Make sure your Outbound Service Interface is of Interface Pattern ‘Stateless (XI30 – Compatible)’. Context Objects are only compatible with Interface Pattern ‘Stateless (XI30 – Compatible)’.,If you cannot view the Context Objects created in ESR in ID, make sure you have assigned the Context Object assigned to the Outbound Service Interface and Interface is in Interface Pattern XI30 – Compatible as shown in Step 2.

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88%

A more complex example with dynamic values for the theme:,Every Context object comes with a Provider React component that allows consuming components to subscribe to context changes.,A React component that subscribes to context changes. Using this component lets you subscribe to a context within a function component.

class App extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <Toolbar theme="dark" />;
  }
}

function Toolbar(props) {
  // The Toolbar component must take an extra "theme" prop  // and pass it to the ThemedButton. This can become painful  // if every single button in the app needs to know the theme  // because it would have to be passed through all components.  return (
    <div>
      <ThemedButton theme={props.theme} />    </div>
  );
}

class ThemedButton extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <Button theme={this.props.theme} />;
  }
}
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Context data objects are identified and routed according to their type, which is unique.,Any names, identifiers or extra properties are optional.,All standard identifier names are reserved names. Applications may use their own identifiers ad hoc. For example:

interface Context {
   type: string;
   name ? : string;
   id ? : {
         [x: string]: string;
      },
      [x: string]: any;
}
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Authentication in a workflow,View workflow run history,Environment variables

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Whenever a Click command is executed, a Context object is created which holds state for this particular invocation. It remembers parsed parameters, what command created it, which resources need to be cleaned up at the end of the function, and so forth. It can also optionally hold an application-defined object.,This state object is then remembered by the context as obj. This is a special attribute where commands are supposed to remember what they need to pass on to their children.,When a Click command callback is executed, it’s passed all the non-hidden parameters as keyword arguments. Notably absent is the context. However, a callback can opt into being passed to the context object by marking itself with pass_context().

import os
import click

class Repo(object):
   def __init__(self, home = None, debug = False):
   self.home = os.path.abspath(home or '.')
self.debug = debug

@click.group()
@click.option('--repo-home', envvar = 'REPO_HOME',
   default = '.repo')
@click.option('--debug/--no-debug',
   default = False,
   envvar = 'REPO_DEBUG')
@click.pass_context
def cli(ctx, repo_home, debug):
   ctx.obj = Repo(repo_home, debug)
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A bytearray object is a mutable array. They are created by the built-in bytearray() constructor. Aside from being mutable (and hence unhashable), byte arrays otherwise provide the same interface and functionality as immutable bytes objects.,These represent an immutable set. They are created by the built-in frozenset() constructor. As a frozenset is immutable and hashable, it can be used again as an element of another set, or as a dictionary key.,This class variable can be assigned a string, iterable, or sequence of strings with variable names used by instances. __slots__ reserves space for the declared variables and prevents the automatic creation of __dict__ and __weakref__ for each instance.

def __hash__(self):
   return hash((self.name, self.nick, self.color))
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This method is then registered with the evaluation context and can be used within an expression string.,You can use the ternary operator for performing if-then-else conditional logic inside the expression. A minimal example is:,Lists can be expressed directly in an expression using {} notation.

The following code introduces the SpEL API to evaluate the literal string expression 'Hello World'.

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("'Hello World'");
String message = (String) exp.getValue();

As an example of method invocation, we call the 'concat' method on the string literal.

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("'Hello World'.concat('!')");
String message = (String) exp.getValue();

As an example of calling a JavaBean property, the String property 'Bytes' can be called as shown below.

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();

// invokes 'getBytes()'
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("'Hello World'.bytes");

byte[] bytes = (byte[]) exp.getValue();

Public fields may also be accessed.

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();

// invokes 'getBytes().length'
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("'Hello World'.bytes.length");

int length = (Integer) exp.getValue();

The String's constructor can be called instead of using a string literal.

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("new String('hello world').toUpperCase()");
String message = exp.getValue(String.class);

The more common usage of SpEL is to provide an expression string that is evaluated against a specific object instance (called the root object). There are two options here and which to choose depends on whether the object against which the expression is being evaluated will be changing with each call to evaluate the expression. In the following example we retrieve the name property from an instance of the Inventor class.

// Create and set a calendar
GregorianCalendar c = new GregorianCalendar();
c.set(1856, 7, 9);

//  The constructor arguments are name, birthday, and nationality.
Inventor tesla = new Inventor("Nikola Tesla", c.getTime(), "Serbian");

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("name");
EvaluationContext context = new StandardEvaluationContext(tesla);

String name = (String) exp.getValue(context);

In the last line, the value of the string variable 'name' will be set to "Nikola Tesla". The class StandardEvaluationContext is where you can specify which object the "name" property will be evaluated against. This is the mechanism to use if the root object is unlikely to change, it can simply be set once in the evaluation context. If the root object is likely to change repeatedly, it can be supplied on each call to getValue, as this next example shows:

/ Create and set a calendar
GregorianCalendar c = new GregorianCalendar();
c.set(1856, 7, 9);

//  The constructor arguments are name, birthday, and nationality.
Inventor tesla = new Inventor("Nikola Tesla", c.getTime(), "Serbian");

ExpressionParser parser = new SpelExpressionParser();
Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("name");

String name = (String) exp.getValue(tesla);

As a final introductory example, the use of a boolean operator is shown using the Inventor object in the previous example.

Expression exp = parser.parseExpression("name == 'Nikola Tesla'");
boolean result = exp.getValue(context, Boolean.class); // evaluates to true

What does this mean in practice? Suppose assignment, using setValue(), is being used to set a List property. The type of the property is actually List<Boolean>. SpEL will recognize that the elements of the list need to be converted to Boolean before being placed in it. A simple example:

class Simple {
    public List<Boolean> booleanList = new ArrayList<Boolean>();
}

Simple simple = new Simple();

simple.booleanList.add(true);

StandardEvaluationContext simpleContext = new StandardEvaluationContext(simple);

// false is passed in here as a string.  SpEL and the conversion service will
// correctly recognize that it needs to be a Boolean and convert it
parser.parseExpression("booleanList[0]").setValue(simpleContext, "false");

// b will be false
Boolean b = simple.booleanList.get(0);
        
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