How to align all td to center except a td with class

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aligncenter
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Stack Overflow for Teams Where developers & technologists share private knowledge with coworkers ,Connect and share knowledge within a single location that is structured and easy to search.,Find centralized, trusted content and collaborate around the technologies you use most.,The combination of the :not and the :first-child selectors will make sure the styling skips the first child of a parent div.

.css

td {
   text - align: center;
}

.foo {
   text - align: left!important;
}
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However, with careful use of CSS selectors we can craft a table layout that can be quickly modified if we change our minds about alignment. Let’s see how we might do that., The awesome thing about CSS is that we can change the alignment of every cell in this table just by switching the values we added to our CSS. So, how about the CSS below? How will the table now show up?, That’s the beauty of using CSS rather than HTML attributes to style web page content. So even though the align attribute is out, don’t despair! Just learn CSS!, This deprecated attribute was once used to center the contents of a table data cell. Sounds easy enough, but image if you were working with a large HTML table and wanted to quickly change the alignment of every <td> element. Suddenly that attribute doesn’t seem like such a good idea. Whether you like the attribute or not, it’s been deprecated in favor of CSS. Let’s take a look at how we would use CSS to accomplish the same effect as the old align attribute. The old way of aligning table cells with align:

This deprecated attribute was once used to center the contents of a table data cell. Sounds easy enough, but image if you were working with a large HTML table and wanted to quickly change the alignment of every <td> element. Suddenly that attribute doesn’t seem like such a good idea. Whether you like the attribute or not, it’s been deprecated in favor of CSS. Let’s take a look at how we would use CSS to accomplish the same effect as the old align attribute. The old way of aligning table cells with align:

<table>
   <tr>
      <th align="left">Left</th>
      <th align="center">Center</th>
      <th align="right">Right</th>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td align="left">Handed</td>
      <td align="center">Fast</td>
      <td align="right">Handed</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td align="left">First base</td>
      <td align="center">Center field</td>
      <td align="right">Catcher</td>
   </tr>
</table>
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To achieve the same effect as the left, center, right or justify values, apply the CSS text-align property to the element.,To achieve the same effect as the char value, give the text-align property the same value you would use for the char. Unimplemented in CSS3.,To achieve a similar effect, use the CSS vertical-align property.,To achieve a similar effect, use the CSS background-color property.

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Note that this would center all H1 declarations. You could reduce the scope of the style by setting the class attribute on the element:,The amount of vertical space inserted between a rule and the content that surrounds it depends on the user agent.,The default is align=center.,Another attribute, defined for the BR element, controls text flow around floating objects.

DEPRECATED EXAMPLE:
This example centers a heading on the canvas.

<H1 align="center"> How to Carve Wood </H1>
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None of these will work. The table itself will be left-aligned, but all the content in the table cells will be centered. , Why? Because "text-align" applies to inline content, not to a block-level element like "table". , "text-align: center" is there for Internet Explorer, which won't work without it. Unfortunately, "text-align: center" will center all the text inside your table cells, but we counter that by setting "tr" and "td" to align left. , The obvious way might appear to use the CSS "text-align: center;" somewhere, maybe like one of these:

The old way to center a table was easy:

  <table align="center">
     ...
  </table>
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The text in <td> elements are regular and left-aligned by default.,The text in <th> elements are bold and centered by default. ,Most browsers will display the <td> element with the following default values: ,Header cells - contains header information (created with the <th> element)

Definition and Usage

The <td> tag defines a standard data cell in an HTML table.

<td>
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Choose from .align-baseline, .align-top, .align-middle, .align-bottom, .align-text-bottom, and .align-text-top as needed.,Change the alignment of elements with the vertical-alignment utilities. Please note that vertical-align only affects inline, inline-block, inline-table, and table cell elements.,Easily change the vertical alignment of inline, inline-block, inline-table, and table cell elements.

<span class="align-baseline">baseline</span>
<span class="align-top">top</span>
<span class="align-middle">middle</span>
<span class="align-bottom">bottom</span>
<span class="align-text-top">text-top</span>
<span class="align-text-bottom">text-bottom</span>
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Our CSS would select all the <li> elements except the one(s) with a class of .different.,The :not() property in CSS is a negation pseudo class and accepts a simple selector or a selector list as an argument. It matches an element that is not represented by the argument. The passed argument may not contain additional selectors or any pseudo-element selectors.,However, if we use a pseudo-element selector as our argument it will not produce the expected result.,i thought this element was well made… an example below:

/* the X argument can be replaced with any simple selectors */: not(X) {
   property: value;
}

In this example we have an unordered list with a single class on the <li>:

<ul>
   <li></li>
   <li class="different"></li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

Our CSS would select all the <li> elements except the one(s) with a class of .different.

/* Style everything but the .different class */
li: not(.different) {
   font - size: 3 em;
}

You could also do the same using pseudo classes which are considered a simple selector.

p: not(: nth - child(2n + 1)) {
   font - size: 3 em;
}

However, if we use a pseudo-element selector as our argument it will not produce the expected result.

: not(::first - line) {
   /* ::first-line is a pseudo element selector and not a simple selector */
   color: white;
}

These are newer than the basic :not() selectors.

/* select all <p>s that are not descendants of <article> */
p:not(article *) {

}

This can get a little mind-bending with just a bit more nesting. For example:

h2:not(:where(article *, section *)) {
  ... 
}

/*
<article>
  <h2> No match! </h2>
</article>

<section>
  <h2> No Match! </h2>
</section>

<aside>
  <h2> Match! </h2>
</aside>
*/
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